The Catherine Albiston Prize

The Catherine Albiston Prize for Recent Developments on Gender, Law & Justice

The Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice is now accepting submissions for its third annual student writing competition.

The Catherine Albiston Prize for Recent Developments on Gender, Law & Justice gives students the opportunity to submit pieces for publication in the Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice during the 2014-2015 academic year.

We invite submissions of research, analysis, narrative, theory, and commentary that critically examine the intersection of gender with one or more other axes of subordination, including, but not limited to, race, class, sexual orientation, and disability. Pieces may be geared toward theoretical legal philosophy or pragmatic, on-the-ground lawyering. We welcome interdisciplinary pieces, but there must be a focus on the law.

It is our experience that papers cannot be judged based on page-length, but rather on the underlying quality of work. With that in mind, we recommend that students submit a manuscript of 30 – 50 pages.

Mandate: Submissions should meet the mandate of the journal.

Our mandate is to publish feminist legal scholarship that critically examines the intersection of gender with one or more other axes of subordination, including, but not limited to, race, class, sexual orientation, and disability.

Because conditions of inequality are continually changing, our mandate is also continually evolving. Pieces may come within the mandate because of their subject matter or because of their analytical attention to differences in social location among women.

Eligibility: In order to qualify for selection, the author must be enrolled as a student in law school for the Spring semester of 2014. If any part of a paper has already been published, or is to be published elsewhere, we cannot accept the piece.

Instructions for Submission:
All entries must be submitted to besshanish@berkeley.edu by June 1st, 2014.

First Annual Issue Launch Party & Alumni Mixer

Please join the Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice for our First Annual Issue Launch Party & Alumni Mixer!

We are excited to reconnect with you, learn about the Journal’s past, and celebrate the launch of our Winter 2014 issue.

Magistrate Judge Donna Ryu, a co-founding member of the Journal, will reflect on the Journal’s history and origins. We will recognize the dedicatees of this issue, Sara Kruzan and Miss Major Griffin-Gracy. Professor Nancy Lemon will present the Jim Fahey Safe Homes for Women Fellowship awards to students who have demonstrated extraordinary service to survivors of domestic violence.

The Journal would not be the thriving organization that it is today without the talented, dedicated, and passionate alums that paved the way.

Let us celebrate you and toast another successful year of publishing intersectional feminist legal scholarship.

We truly hope to see you at this exciting event!

Monday, April 07, 2014
06:00 PM – 08:00 PM
Steindardt Courtyard
Boalt Hall
Berkeley CA

Email bglj.alumni@gmail.com to RSVP.

Light refreshments will be served.

Speech, Symbols, and Substantial Obstacles: The Doing and “Undue”ing of Abortion Law since Casey

Friday, October 4, 2013
UC Berkeley, School of Law
110 Boalt Hall
Reception to follow – Warren Room, 295 Boalt Hall

Registration          Agenda         Biographies    

The Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice at Berkeley Law, the Center for Reproductive Rights, and the Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice will present a daylong, interdisciplinary symposium at Berkeley Law on Friday, October 4, 2013.

Thought leaders from diverse disciplines will examine the constitutive power and widespread impact of current laws related to abortion in the United States. Discussion will focus on Planned Parenthood v. Casey’s undue burden standard; the way this “standardless standard” is playing out in courts across the country, altering people’s access to and experience of abortion care. How have legal frames influenced the public’s understanding of abortion and its perceptions of those who seek abortions? How do abortion regulations interact with other areas of law, including freedom of speech? How do abortion restrictions harm individuals, families, and communities, threatening access to services, compelling parenthood, and compounding other forms of marginalization?

Confirmed Speakers/Moderators/Discussants:

  • Brigitte Amiri, Senior Staff Attorney, ACLU Reproductive Freedom Project 

  • Caitlin Borgmann, Professor of Law, CUNY School of Law

  • Khiara Bridges, Associate Professor of Law and Associate Professor of Anthropology, Boston University School of Law

  • Kimberly Buchanan, Associate Professor of Law and Gender Studies, USC Gould School of Law

  • Caroline Corbin, Associate Professor of Law, University of Miami School of Law 

  • Jesse Choper, Earl Warren Professor of Public Law, Berkeley Law

  • Sara Dubow, Associate Professor of History, Williams College

  • Dan Grossman, Assistant Clinical Professor, Dept. of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences, UCSF; Vice President of Research, Ibis Reproductive Health

  • Sujatha Jesudason, Director, CoreAlign, UC San Francisco

  • Carol Joffe, Professor, Bixby Center for Global Reproductive Health, UCSF; Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSIRH); Professor Emerita, Dept. of Sociology, University of California, Davis   

  • Pamela Karlan, Kenneth and Harle Montgomery Professor of Public Interest Law, Stanford Law School

  • Allison Lauterbach, Symposium Editor, Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice

  • Kristin Luker, Faculty Director, Center on Reproductive Rights and Justice; Elizabeth Josselyn Boalt Professor of Law; Professor of Sociology 

  • Gillian Metzger, Stanley H. Fuld Professor of Law; Vice Dean, Columbia Law School

  • Melissa Murray, Professor of Law, Berkeley Law

  • Kimberly Mutcherson, Professor, Rutgers University School of Law-Camden 

  • Nancy Northup, President and CEO, Center for Reproductive Rights

  • Carol Sanger, Barbara Aronstein Black Professor of Law, Columbia Law School

  • Neil Siegel, Professor of Law and Political Science, Duke Law

  • Tracy Weitz, Associate Professor, Department of Obstetrics, Gynecology & Reproductive Sciences Director, Advancing New Standards in Reproductive Health (ANSIRH), UC San Francisco 

  • Alyssa Wulf, Principal and Director of Programs, Real Reason


Registration is required and will open August 2013.  MCLE credits will be available.

Co-sponsored by the Townsend Center for the Humanities

The Catherine Albiston Prize for Recent Developments on Gender, Law & Justice

The Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice is now accepting submissions for its second annual student writing competition.

The Catherine Albiston Prize for Recent Developments on Gender, Law & Justice gives students the opportunity to submit pieces for publication in the Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice during the 2013-2014 academic year.

We invite submissions of research, analysis, narrative, theory, and commentary that critically examine the intersection of gender with one or more other axes of subordination, including, but not limited to, race, class, sexual orientation, and disability. Pieces may be geared toward theoretical legal philosophy or pragmatic, on-the-ground lawyering. We welcome interdisciplinary pieces, but there must be a focus on the law.

It is our experience that papers cannot be judged based on page-length, but rather on the underlying quality of work. With that in mind, we recommend that students submit a manuscript of 30 – 50 pages

Mandate: Submissions should meet the mandate of the journal.

Because conditions of inequality are continually changing, our mandate is also continually evolving. Pieces may come within the mandate because of their subject matter or because of their analytical attention to differences in social location among women.

Eligibility: In order to qualify for selection, the author must be enrolled as a student in law school for the Spring semester of 2013. If any part of a paper has already been published, or is to be published elsewhere, we cannot accept the piece.

Instructions for Submission: All entries must be submitted to BGLJ.Solicitations@gmail.com by May 15, 2013.

Student Contest Flyer

Symposium Sponsor: Munger, Tolles & Olson

The Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice is pleased to announce the generous sponsorship by Munger, Tolles & Olson of our symposium, Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia. Please see our symposium flyer here: Presumed Incompetent

Please read more about Munger, Tolles & Olson’s commitment to diversity here, or continue reading below: From Our Sponsor

Munger, Tolles & Olson is deeply committed to the advancement of women of color in the legal profession. This year, three of our four new partners are women of color and one of our new partners works reduced hours. In the past five years, more than half of Munger Tolles attorneys promoted to partner have been women.

Diversity has been a long-time priority for the firm, dating back to our firm’s start in 1962 when Carla Hills was among the founding partners. We are ranked Number 4 nationwide in diversity by The American Lawyer and we are the only firm that has been in the top three spots on the magazine’s A-List for six straight years, including three years as No. 1. Our current firm-wide managing partner is a woman, and our management committee comprises 25% women.

For more information about our diversity initiatives, please visit www.mto.com/diversity-inclusion

Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia

On Friday, March 8, 2013, the Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law and Justice will host an all-day symposium (8:30 am to 5:30 pm) to invite responses from a variety of scholars to a book called Presumed Incompetent: The Intersections of Race and Class for Women in Academia (published in September 2012 by Utah State University Press).  Through personal narratives and qualitative empirical studies, the more than 40 contributors to Presumed Incompetent examine the obstacles that female faculty of color encounter on the road to tenure and beyond, and propose creative and empowering strategies to survive and thrive in the academic workplace.

The symposium will begin at 8:30 am at UC Berkeley School of Law (corner of College and Bancroft) and will conclude at 5:30 pm.

The Presumed Incompetent symposium is free and open to the public. If you would like to attend, please RSVP at: http://presumedincompetent.eventbrite.com/

You can read about Presumed Incompetent on the publisher’s web page: http://www.usu.edu/usupress/books/index.cfm?isbn=8695

For an overview of the book, please download the Introduction at:http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/papers.cfm?abstract_id=2017249

Parking: You can find information on parking at this link: http://www.law.berkeley.edu/1521.htm

You can also purchase a parking pass in advance: http://pt.berkeley.edu/pay/permit/permitlist#otherpermit

Please download the Symposium Program here: Presumed Incompetent Program

2012 Barbara Nachtrieb Armstrong Award for Outstanding Advocacy on Behalf of Social Justice for Women: Anne Tamar-Mattis

The Journal created the Barbara Nachtrieb Armstrong Award for Outstanding Advocacy on Behalf of Social Justice for Women in 1985 when theJournal was founded. Barbara Nachtrieb Armstrong was the only woman in the Boalt Hall Class of 1915. She became the Morrison Professor of Municipal Law, Emeritus, and was the first tenured woman law professor in the United States. She was instrumental in drafting state and federal social security acts and also published a monumental text on family law and community property.

The Armstrong Award is a national award open to all people—including scholars, community workers, legal practitioners, and activists—who demonstrate outstanding advocacy on behalf of social justice for women and underrepresented genders. The recipient is chosen by the membership of the Journal.

The recipient of this year’s Armstrong Award is Anne Tamar-Mattis. Ms. Tamar-Mattis, a Berkeley Law alumna and former Journal member, currently teaches Sexual Orientation & the Law at Berkeley Law and is the Founder & Executive Director of Advocates for Informed Choice—the nation’s first and only organization that provides legal advocacy on behalf of children with intersex conditions or differences of sex development. Advocates for Informed Choice builds upon the peer support and political advocacy work already taking place within the intersex community by providing patient advocates and members of the media with the resources they need to support children born with intersex conditions and by stimulating legal dialogue about the civil and human rights of intersex children. Ms. Tamar-Mattis is also deeply involved in the LGBT rights movement: among her many endeavors, she has served as the director of the San Francisco LGBT Community Center, an intern with the National Center for Lesbian Rights and the East Bay Community Law Center’s HIV Law Clinic, and the director of a peer-support hotline for LGBT youth.

The Journal is very proud of Anne Tamar-Mattis and is honored to present her with the Barbara Nachtrieb Armstrong Award for her ongoing advocacy on behalf of LGBT and intersex communities.

 

Volume 27:1 Dedication

Volume 27 of the Berkeley Journal of Gender, Law & Justice is dedicated to Girls Kick It, a non-profit organization that emotionally and economically empowers female youth who have been displaced by the Northern Ugandan Civil War. Girls Kick It provides young women living in Gulu town and the Paicho Internally Displaced Persons Camp with team-building and leadership-building activities and weekly soccer practice. The girls who have participated in the program have demonstrated new-found confidence, teamwork, and the belief that they have control of their futures as a result of their involvement with Girls Kick It.

Girls Kick It and its parent organization, Global Youth Partnership for Africa (GYPA) are responsible for a wide variety of projects that combat rampant gender inequality in East Africa. For example, they have organized a mixed-gender team to represent Uganda at the annual Homeless World Cup that took place in Cape Town in 2006 and Denmark in 2007. Girls Kick It and GYPA also organized the first all-female delegation to Female Homeless World Cup in Melbourne  in 2008 and then again in Rio in 2010. Girls Kick It now plans to expand its services by providing the loan funding to build a gweno (poultry) house in Paicho and the management training necessary to oversee this enterprise. In doing so, the Girls Kick It team will, for the first time, provide a real economic opportunity for the young girls and women of Paicho.

In a region traumatized by war where many displaced women and girls are forced to spend their childhoods as sex slaves, Girls Kick It uses the power of sport to transform women’s lives and get them involved in ongoing efforts to train, educate, empower, and unite the people of Uganda.  Girls Kick It is a source of hope for Ugandan women, and, given its expanding mission, we believe that it will continue to create lasting changes in that region.